The Luxurious, Affordable and Memorable Rainbow Beach

Rainbow Beach is a coastal town 30 minutes north of Brisbane in Queensland. By 2011, its population is only 1,103. Deriving its name from its rainbow-coloured sand dunes, which was caused by a rich content of minerals, it was originally known as Black Beach. It is a popular tourist destination by itself. With its beautiful sand dunes, you and your special someone, your family and friends can enjoy your holidays in this quiet and idyllic beach town. You may see the Carlo Sand Blow, ride a kayak with dolphins, have point surf lessons, do horse riding, enjoy a beach and sand safari, sky dive, marvel at Wolf Rock Dive Centre, be amazed at Poona Lake, ride in a Rainbow Beach helicopter, do a backpacker day tour, enjoy the sunset in Carlo Point Marina, enjoy Seary’s Creek, have Cooloola Eco Tours, hire a boat…it’s basically endless. But the first thing you have to do and get right is make sure you get a luxurious but affordable Rainbow Beach accommodation.

Luxurious but affordable beach accommodation

One of the main challenges of people who go on holidays is their accommodation. Much as every hour of your day would be spent outside, the moment you turn in, wouldn’t it be the comforts of home you would be looking for?

So, how does a luxurious, affordable Rainbow Beach accommodation measure up?

1. Guests should be able to book even a single night even on a weekend. Of course, longer accommodation is always welcome.

2. Tranquil location of the accommodation should be at the heart of Rainbow Beach.

3. All bedroom suites should be affordable; be it a one, two or three bedroom suites. It should be self-contained with a private veranda surrounded by a lush garden. It should have, upon your choice, its own kitchen and dining facilities with nearby restaurants and shops just a stroll away.

4. Beds should be comfortable with quality linen. The beach accommodation suite should be clean.

5. You should be able to adjust the air conditioning to your liking.

6. WiFi is available and so is a collection of DVDs.

7. The beach accommodation is capable of organizing a tour like going to Fraser Island and other hotspots.

8. There should be a free car, trailer and boat parking.

At the end of your enjoyable and memorable stay, you are assured you are refreshed and had already promised to yourself to come back again. Click here Rainbow Beach Accommodation

Making your time jam-packed in Rainbow Beach

Have a locale help you with your adventure on your stay. They would know all there is to see. Better yet stay in a Rainbow Beach accommodation run by a locale so you don’t waste time figuring out where to go to next. You don’t need to pay extra for this. Just get a premier accommodation, just like what you’ll get in Debbie’s Place.

Operating for the last 14 years, they are always on the list of the best hotels or motels to stay in the area. With the difficulty of getting affordable but luxurious places to stay in Rainbow Beach, this is already your ticket. Get in touch with Debbie and book online in http://rainbowbeachaccommodation.com.au/.

 

Charleston Beaches

The surrounding barrier islands and beaches of Charleston have their own Southern charm, and give adventuresome travelers a chance to escape the city.

Free-spirited Folly Beach, with its mix of beachcombers and bohemians, is the most laidback of the local island scene. Spend the day watching surfers line up in the Washout, an area on the east side of Folly considered one of the best spots on the East Coast, then take a surfing lesson at Shaka Surf School. Hour-long semi-private and private lessons are available. Or try the weekend “Wemoon” camps for women. Weeklong vacationers and their kids also sign up for Shaka’s surf camps each morning from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Folly is also ideal for dolphin watching by boat or kayak with Flipper Finders tours. Head into the river to watch families of dolphins strand feed (a phenomenon where the mammals herd schools of fish onto shore), then launch onto the sand to dine before sliding back into the waves. There are also sunset tours of Folly River to see stingrays and bonnethead sharks, and moonlight tours of the creeks.

Cities: How crowded life is changing us

Cities cover just 3% of the planet’s land surface, but are already home to more than half of its people. That means cities are bringing people into ever greater contact, where collectively they act as a giant physical, biological and cultural force. Transport links and communication between cities, from superhighways to express trains and planes, allow businesses to operate planet-wide, shrinking the human world and making the global local.

The great homogenisation of the Anthropocene includes human culture and lifestyle as much as any effect on the natural ecosystem. And cities are the biggest expression of that. They truly are universal. I feel at home in cities around the world precisely because they essentially provide the same experience. Some are more violent, or more sleepy, or more wealthy, but the urban environment is at its heart the same. There is not the vast diversity of landscape and experience that exists across the natural world.

The sheer concentration of people attracted by the urban lifestyle means that cosmopolitan cities like New York are host to people speaking more than 800 different languages – thought to be the highest language density in the world. In London, less than half of the population is made of white Britons – down from 58% a decade ago. Meanwhile, languages around the world are declining at a faster rate than ever – one of the 7,000 global tongues dies every two weeks.

It is having an effect not just culturally, but biologically: urban melting pots are genetically altering humans. The spread of genetic diversity can be traced back to the invention of the bicycle, according to geneticist Steve Jones, which encouraged the intermarriage of people between villages and towns. But the urbanisation occurring now is generating unprecedented mixing. As a result, humans are now more genetically similar than at any time in the last 100,000 years, Jones says.

The genetic and cultural melange does a lot to erode the barriers between races, as well as leading to novel works of art, science and music that draw on many perspectives. And the tight concentration of people in a city also leads to other tolerances and practices, many of which are less common in other human habitats (like the village) or in other species. For example, people in a metropolis are generally freer to practice different religions or none, to be openly gay, for women to work and to voluntarily limit their family size despite – or indeed because of – access to greater resources.

Virtual revolution

Now that the technology exists for individuals to communicate instantly with companies, government departments, to broadcast to millions or to specific groups over the internet, the city has gained an entirely new dimension. This “virtual city” of communities formed online, using social networks like Twitter or Facebook, is incredibly powerful and not necessarily limited to the geographical contours of the real city. Like-minded individuals can find each other easily, gathering in online forums or through hashtags and comment streams in the same way as special interest clubs and cafe movements coalesce in the real city. Virtual applications make it easier to sift through a crowd – the Grindr app, for example, allows gay people to find other users of the app in a public setting. Online clubs – like the shopping network Groupon – are attempting to personalise trade exchanges and perhaps develop a proxy for the relationship people might have with a neighbourhood store.

Those petitioning for social or political change can hold governments and companies accountable in a manner never possible before. Instead of ploughing through books of corporate ledgers in libraries, vast amounts of data are now published online and can be searched and filtered in minutes with algorithms, allowing journalists and other groups to discover corruption, tax evasion or other information of public interest. Such information can be self-published in seconds, where it is available for billions to see. In a few seconds, I can compare hospital cancer survival rates in my area or nationally, I can look up how much profit popular stores shift to offshore accounts to avoid taxation, or read hundreds of reviews of a product I’m thinking of buying.

The virtual and real cities are closely enmeshed. Information gathering and community building can take place more easily online than in the vast cities of the Anthropocene, where members of a group may live far from each other or be unable to meet easily for momentum-building. But the discussions and real-world changes these online gatherings initiate move easily to government chambers, mainstream media outlets in television, radio and press, or onto the streets. The Arab revolutions across Northern Africa and the Middle East since 2010 were coordinated via the virtual city of Twitter, Facebook, SMS messaging and other apps, but they took place on the streets and squares of the real cities, uniting flesh-and-blood individuals who had united online using computers and smartphones. Starbucks was compelled by a Twitter campaign to pay billions of pounds of tax to the UK government after its perfectly legal offshore tax evasion was revealed in 2012.

So the virtual city is as global as it is local. I can get hourly updates on air-pollution levels in my neighbourhood or buy a new battery for my phone from Korea. People from across the world can gather online to share ideas, pressure for change, innovate, spread their artistic talents or make friends. The virtual city provides a way of shrinking and filtering the real megacity, saving time and energy on real journeys across complicated spaces, of accessing multiple conversations with relative anonymity, and of individually helping steer humanity through collaborative creativity and problem solving. It enhances but doesn’t replace the real city with its face-to-face social cues, physical exchanges and wealth of information humans use to make judgements about trustworthiness and other value-laden decisions.

The virtual city does have a more problematic side, however. Never has there been so much information about so much of our lives in such an accessible form. In the course of a day, the average person in a Western city is said to be exposed to as much data as someone in the 15th century would encounter in their entire life. The digital birth of a baby now precedes the analogue version by an average of 3 months, as parents post sonogram images on Facebook and register their infant’s domain name before the child is even born. Governments, groups, individuals and corporations can access data about us and use it for their own purposes.

This erosion of individual privacy can be benign or malevolent, but it is already a part of life in the Anthropocene. Customer data collected by the US supermarket Target allows it to identify with a high degree of accuracy which shoppers have recently conceived and when their due date is. The store uses this information to target such women for advertising of its pregnancy and baby products in a timely fashion, even if she has not yet told anyone else. Sinister? Maybe. What about police officers identifying householders as marijuana growers by analysing energy use data? Or neighbours targeting individuals for cyber or physical bullying because of information they discover online? We’re all generating data, every time we make an ATM transactions or log onto a website. In the Anthropocene, we will have to decide who owns our data and whether it can be shared.

HAWAII VACATION- ROMANCE IN THE ISLANDS OF ALOHA

As one of the oldest languages, Hawaiian is a beautiful, flowing collection of words and phrases that captures the natural beauty of the Hawaiian islands with melody, hidden meanings and wonderful mysteries. A special language is needed to describe the islands of Hawaii, for Webster’s words cannot adequately portray the palm trees on the coast of Oahu backlit and ablaze by the setting sun, let alone the endless black sand beaches of Kalapana, the dominant rainforests across the Big Island or the cascading waterfalls that prance over Molokai’s volcanic rocks. Yet the Hawaiian language contains no word for romance. While some say Eskimos have over 20 words for snow, Hawaiians should have over a hundred words for romance considering the islands’ idyllic surroundings, luxurious hotels, celebrated restaurants and relaxing spas. Even without the definitive word, Hawaii stands alone as the tropical beacon of romance, dedicated to the secrets and songs that stir the heart.